Other sites
Sections

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

EcoEvol

Eco-evolutionary approaches to understanding and predicting the response of species and ecosystems to climate change


In this initiative, contributing to Focus 3 of the bioDISCOVERY scientific strategy as well as to Focus 3 of the bioGENESIS scientific strategy, the two DIVERSITAS projects, bioDISCOVERY  and bioGENESIS are collaborating to improve our modelling capacity of species' and ecosystem's response  to climate change taking into account evolutionary constraints on species. Goal of this initiative is is to create an international network of scientists working on bridging the gaps between evolutionary, molecular and functional ecology with the specific goal of contributing to the development or improvement of models that account for both evolutionary and functional processes.

A first workshop, sponsored by the EU EVOLTREE programme, DIVERSITAS and the ESE laboratory in Orsay, France (Aug. 2009, Paris, France) aimed at 1) creating an international network of scientists working on bridging the gaps between evolutionary, molecular and functional ecology with the specific goal of contributing to the development or improvement of models that account for both evolutionary and functional processes; and 2) providing training for young scientists who are interested in the new and rapidly expanding field of eco-evolutionary research. For a summary of the workshop conclusions, click here.

The second workshop (Aug. 2010, Fukuoka, Japan) was aimed at continuing developing this collaborative effort. A more narrow focus was placed on the genetic basis of species-level responses to climate in plants, especially trees, and on developing a predictive understanding of how genetic variation in key functional traits will mediate the impacts of climate change on species abundance and distribution (workshop report).

A third workshop (Sept 2012, Montreal, Canada), was focused on "Ecological interactions and range evolution under environmental change". Aims of the meeting were to identify the progress made to date in the understanding of how different classes of ecological interactions hinder or foster range adaptation, to identify the likelihood that entire communities may or may not shift together, resulting in the assembly of entirely new communities with different functional characteristics, and to identify the joint role evolution and species interactions might play in defining the future spatial distribution of biodiversity and ecosystem services at large spatial scales. During the meeting, a conceptual model of what components are necessary to link ecology and evolution and an overview table of different approaches to monitor species response were developed (workshop report).

Thanks to funding (see here) received from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDIV), and with contributions from the University of Aberdeen and DIVERSITAS, two further workshops, focused on synthesising population, community, genetic and evolutionary dynamics in a simulation platform, will be conducted in October 2013 and 2014.

Document Actions
Personal tools